Legal duties for vibration - Vibration - Healthy Working Lives

Vibration

Understand and minimise the effects of vibration

Exposure to vibration could have a negative effect on the health of your employees. It could damage joints, muscles, circulation and sensory nerves.

This could lead to considerable pain, time off or even disability.

Use the links below to find information on how to assess the risks, calculate vibration levels in your workplace and precautions you can take.

  1. Common vibration hazards and controls
  2. Understand vibration levels
  3. Precautions to reduce vibration
  4. Legal duties for vibration

4. Legal duties for vibration

​Control of Vibration at Work Regulations 2005

These require you to guarantee that the risks from vibration are controlled. You have to provide information, instruction and training on the risks that your employees encountered. This includes the controls that you have put in place to reduce their exposure.

The legislation also explains when you need to provide health surveillance to your employees.

You can find out more about the Control of Vibration at Work Regulations 2005 on the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) site.

Visit the HSE site for guidance on the Control of Vibration at Work Regulations​

Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR)

Under RIDDOR you need to report to the HSE if one of your employees has been diagnosed with carpel tunnel syndrome (compressed or trapped nerves in the wrist) or hand arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) caused by vibration at work.

You can find out more about RIDDOR on the HSE site.

Visit the HSE site for guidance on RIDDOR​​