Violence and aggression legislation - Violence and aggression - Healthy Working Lives

Violence and aggression

Your duty to protect employees, how to identify risks and precautions you can take

As an employer, y​​​​ou have a duty to manage the risks related to violence and aggression at work.

Use the links below to find information and resources to help you assess the risks and manage violence and aggression at work. You will also find information on your legal duties as an employer.

  1. Common types of violence and aggression
  2. Violence and aggression precautions
  3. Violence and aggression legislation

3. Violence and aggression legislation

Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974

This places general duties on employers and employees that are applicable to work-related violence and personal safety. You have a duty to ensure the health and safety at work of all your employees. It also states that to achieve this you need to provide adequate

  • training
  • instruction
  • information
  • supervision.

It also places duties on employees. They must take reasonable care of their own safety and that of others. They must cooperate with their employer to help them meet their legal obligations.

You can find out more about the Health and Safety at Work etc Act on the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) site.

Visit the HSE site for guidance on the Health and Safet​​​y at Work etc Act​​​​

Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999

Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 state that you must assess the risks to employees and make arrangements for their health and safety by effective

  • planning
  • organising
  • control
  • monitoring
  • review.

Reporting of Injuries, Disease and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR)

Many of the incidents referred to in this guidance may not be reportable under the Reporting of Injuries, Disease and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR). However, for those that involve physical injury, employers must notify the Health and Safety Executive of an accident at work resulting in

  • death
  • specified injury
  • incapacity for normal work for more than seven consecutive days.

This includes any act of non-consensual physical violence inflicted on a person at work. This can be reported via the Health and Safety Executive site.

Worker consultation

The Safety Representatives and Safety Committees Regulations 1977 and Health and Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations 1996 expresses your duty to inform and consult with employees in good time on matters relating to their health and safety.

Equality Act 2010

The Equality Act 2010 protects people from discrimination in the workplace and society in general. They create the framework for you to protect employees from harassment and allow the employee to take their employer to an employment tribunal.

Emergency Workers (Scotland) Act 2005 (EWA)

Emergency Workers (Scotland) Act 2005 (EWA) makes it a specific offence to assault, obstruct or delay someone providing an emergency service, or someone assisting an emergency worker in an emergency situation. The EWA is generally used for less serious assaults. More violent incidents can be prosecuted using a range of common law offences from assault to murder.