Health and safety training legislation - Healthy Working Lives

Instruction and training

Clear instructions, information and adequate training for your employees

You need to provide training and instructions to your employees to ensure that they are able to carry out their tasks safely and without risks to health.

Training is helping and showing employees what they should and should not do when they carry out their workplace activities.

Employees should be suitably trained in all aspects of their job from the most menial to the riskiest activities in the workplace.

Suitable employee training can reduce workplace incidents and accidents which in turn can lead to reduced costs, lower insurance premiums and fewer potential lawsuits. It would also promote a healthier, safer and happier workforce.

Workplace instruction can be carried out in various ways, it could be a written document such as a method statement, or it could be verbal communication from a line manager or colleague.

  1. Who needs health and safety training
  2. Types of workplace health and safety training
  3. Sources of health and safety training
  4. Health and safety training legislation

4. Health and safety training legislation

For legal requirements and health and safety purposes, you will need to take appropriate action to protect employees, this can include the provision of information, training and supervision.

You have a legal duty under MHSWR to co-operate with other employers to ensure compliance with health and safety law.

Health and Safety at Work Act 1974

The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 requires employers to provide free of charge training, instruction and supervision necessary for all its employees. Those who have control over premises have to consider the safety of anyone who comes on the premises, including contractors and customers.

Visit the HSE site for information about the Health and Safety at Work Act

Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 places a duty on employers to assess and manage risks to their employees and others arising from work activities. Employees must work safely in accordance with their training and the instructions given to them.

Visit the HSE site for Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations

Safety Representatives and Safety Committee Regulations 1977

The Safety Representatives and Safety Committee Regulations 1977 and the Health and Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations 1996 explained how employers consult their employees and their Trade Union Representatives on health and safety issues within the workplace.

Visit the HSE site for Safety Representatives and Safety Committee Regulations

Health and Safety (Training for Employment) Regulations 1990

The Health and Safety (Training for Employment) Regulations 1990 are regulations that provide guidance for employees who will need to be trained in the workplace, they also explain what is termed as an employee, it includes all trainees, such as work apprentices, trainee doctors, nurses, work experience. All of these categories will be treated the same as any other employee under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

Visit the HSE site for Health and Safety (training for employment) Regulations